Interactive fiction: Weaving together literacies of text and code

We propose structural parallels between textual literacy and computational literacy, and explore interactive fiction as a medium at their intersection. We designed and built a web application allowing students to read and write interactive fiction and a curriculum weaving the two literacies together. A study evaluating the curriculum found modest adoption of literacy practices from each domain. Our qualitative observations suggest a mechanism for how each literacy can support the other: incorporating computation into En- glish/Language Arts makes it possible for students to model linguistic processes which are otherwise ephemeral. In the other direction, situating Computer Science concepts in stu- dents’ identities and experiences can make them personally meaningful and address inequities in STEM education. A third study, underway, will quantify the extent to which one literacy supports growth in the other.

Download full text

APA

Proctor, C., & Blikstein, P. (2017). Interactive fiction: Weaving together literacies of text and code. Proceedings of the 2017 Conference on Interaction Design and Children, 555–560. https://doi.org/10.1145/3078072.3084324

Bibtex

@inproceedings{proctor2017interactive,
  title = {Interactive Fiction: {{Weaving}} Together Literacies of Text and Code},
  shorttitle = {Interactive Fiction},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 2017 {{Conference}} on {{Interaction Design}} and {{Children}}},
  author = {Proctor, Chris and Blikstein, Paulo},
  year = {2017},
  month = jun,
  pages = {555--560},
  publisher = {{ACM}},
  address = {{Stanford California USA}},
  doi = {10.1145/3078072.3084324},
  abstract = {We propose structural parallels between textual literacy and computational literacy, and explore interactive fiction as a medium at their intersection. We designed and built a web application allowing students to read and write interactive fiction and a curriculum weaving the two literacies together. A study evaluating the curriculum found modest adoption of literacy practices from each domain. Our qualitative observations suggest a mechanism for how each literacy can support the other: incorporating computation into English/Language Arts makes it possible for students to model linguistic processes which are otherwise ephemeral. In the other direction, situating Computer Science concepts in students' identities and experiences can make them personally meaningful and address inequities in STEM education. A third study, underway, will quantify the extent to which one literacy supports growth in the other.},
  isbn = {978-1-4503-4921-5},
  language = {en}
}