Framing Computational Thinking for Computational Literacies in K-12 Education

Kafai, Y., Proctor, C., & Lui, D. (2019). Framing computational thinking for computational literacies in k-12 education. Proceedings of the Weizenbaum Conference 2019 "Challenges of Digital Inequality - Digital Education, Digital Work, Digital Life" (pp. 1–6).

The last decade has seen an increased interest in promoting computing education for all, focused on the idea of “computational thinking.” Currently, three framings for promoting computational thinking in K-12 education have been proposed, emphasizing either (1) skill and competency building, (2) creative expression and participation, or (3) social justice and reflection. While each of these empha- ses is valuable and needed, their narrow focus can obscure important issues and miss critical trans- formational opportunities for empowering students as competent, creative, and critical agents. We argue that these computational framings should be seen as literacies, thereby historicizing and situat- ing computer science with respect to broader educational concerns and providing new directions for how schools can help students to actively participate in designing their digital futures.

Cite this paper

@inproceedings{kafai_2019_framing,
    author = "Kafai, Yasmin and Proctor, Chris and Lui, Debora",
    title = "Framing Computational Thinking for Computational Literacies in K-12 Education",
    abstract = "The last decade has seen an increased interest in promoting computing education for all, focused on the idea of “computational thinking.” Currently, three framings for promoting computational thinking in K-12 education have been proposed, emphasizing either (1) skill and competency building, (2) creative expression and participation, or (3) social justice and reflection. While each of these empha- ses is valuable and needed, their narrow focus can obscure important issues and miss critical trans- formational opportunities for empowering students as competent, creative, and critical agents. We argue that these computational framings should be seen as literacies, thereby historicizing and situat- ing computer science with respect to broader educational concerns and providing new directions for how schools can help students to actively participate in designing their digital futures.",
    booktitle = {Proceedings of the Weizenbaum Conference 2019 "Challenges of Digital Inequality - Digital Education, Digital Work, Digital Life"},
    year = "2019",
    location = "Berlin, Germany",
    pages = "1--6",
    numpages = "6",
    keywords = "Computational thinking, literacy, critical pedagogy, programming",
    url = "https://chrisproctor.net/publications/kafai\_2019\_framing",
    pdf = "https://chrisproctor.net/media/publications/kafai\_2019\_framing.pdf"
}

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